Corporate Wellness and Finding Joy in Life

While on vacation at Canyon Ranch in Tucson, I had an opportunity to take a workshop about joy. It’s a little word for such a big concept. Without that je ne sais quoi that puts a smile on one’s face and pep in each step, life can become a series of “must do” items instead of “let’s go” moments. That’s not an ideal outcome for individuals or their friends and families. Companies have a stake in the happiness game as well.

Motivated and satisfied employees can add to the bottom line through productivity gains. Employees on the other end of the spectrum can add to health care costs and reduced output due to excessive absences. According to the Global Wellness Institute website, “The world’s 3.2 billion workers are increasingly unwell.” This explains why companies around the globe spend upwards of $40 billion on wellness programs.

A few years ago, the Rand Institute carried out a large-scale survey of nearly 600,000 individuals who participated in wellness programs offered by seven companies. What they found may surprise some. While the lion’s share of wellness budgets was spent on improving lifestyle skills such as smoking cessation or losing weight, return on investment (“ROI”) was significantly higher for disease management efforts. The take away is that employers are not allocating monies wisely and need to modify accordingly.

If true that organizations should budget mostly on addressing existing illnesses or preventing new realizations, there could be a heightened demand for psychological or behavioral specialists. Those individuals who can afford to seek outside help will clamor to understand their malaise and emotional deficit, even when their bosses look askance.

In his Forbes opinion piece, Dan Pontefract discusses the importance of sharing a vision that excites and empowers. He cites surveys that demonstrate a C-suite awareness of the purpose-profit connection even when these same executives do little to activate their team around a shared vision. Instead of rewarding people for short-term bottom line advances, this author and researcher urges companies to ratchet up their efforts to do well by doing good. Whether the metric is excellent client service or operating with better ethics than a peer, his take is that managers should address more than the quarterly bottom line.

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